Experts Provide Clinical Overview of Drug Recovery Experience

Experts Provide Clinical Overview of Drug Recovery Experience

i Jul 30th No Comments by

Reporting on CORE Conference Summer 2016

I attended this conference on Amelia Island Florida in July. The membership goal is to improve accessibility to and the quality of addiction treatment and to promote recovery solutions.

Ivanka Grahovac, Executive Director, Austin Recovery

I am with Ivanka Grahovac, Executive Director, Austin Recovery. She shared her own recovery experience from heroin to advocate for change at the CORE conference.

The conference is “structured as a forum to increase the collective understanding of the addiction recovery processes.” Participants are eager, in general, to improve addiction treatment outcomes by better integrating abstinence-based practices and Twelve-Step principles into therapeutic initiatives.

Four themes emerged during the four day event.

  1. Abstinence versus medication assisted treatment for recovery

More often, meds are being delivered in a physician’s office, administered in many cases by the physician’s assistant. Atlanta has seen this trend with Adderall. Used to be, a psychologist or psychiatrist would diagnose ADD or ADHD and submit the treatment plan with a prescription. Nowadays, people can get a prescription, without the rigorous assessment that was required formerly. In the case of opioid addiction, many physician’s assistants are writing the treatment plan. And many are not necessarily trained to develop it.  Doctors’ offices are focused on harm reduction, which is good. But do they understand the cravings? Do they understand how medication could actually threaten authentic sobriety? These were the sorts of questions and issues that were explored.

  1. Suboxone in the wake of a national opioid addiction trend. Just how helpful is it?

Suboxone is used as a detox agent, and it represents a $1.5 Billion market. Doctors wrote 9 million prescriptions last year. One expert stated, “And guess what? It’s harder to kick than heroin.”  Insurance companies encourage its use, allegedly, because users don’t need to go into detox, which costs insurance companies money. Many experts rejected claims of its benefits, because “it undermines the brain’s ability to present as one’s authentic self.”

Without “full surrender to abstinence, people cannot engage in recovery and 12-step (programs) as their own, real, authentic selves,” said the CEO of a recovery program. Otherwise, claimed many experts, people trying to recover can remain isolated and addicted.

  1. Twelve step programs and the role of a higher power in addiction. The most compelling speakers, across the board, advocated for complete abstinence to support this notion of showing up as yourself, no one else, because it is the surest way to remodel the brain and change behavior. No surprise that drug manufacturers and insurance companies were not present at CORE. Unless they were under the radar. Is “Big Pharma” too busy selling “meds” to physicians’ offices and using Public Relations to sell only part of the story to consumers, so that consumers will be the very people asking for those drugs? And is that a good thing?

“Full surrender” to medication-free recovery made a suboxone prescription sound sketchy, at best. But there is no question that some specific co-occurring disorders warrant medication.

4.   Pornography addiction is a big ugly taboo problem. It is impacting a lot of folks, particularly 12-16 year olds who watch online. It has serious implications for brain receptors, in terms of the stimulation, even compared to what certain drugs do to the brain. I don’t know anything more, but will keep you posted.

The many dedicated professionals were on hand at CORE who are committed to helping people recover and lead full and happy lives – they were nothing short of inspiring. I am so glad I was able to attend and learn more about what they do, how they help others. Want to learn more about CORE?

http://core-conference.com/about-core/